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A Quick Lesson in Business Communication

Communication Tip: If it’s not the project manager or the project team, then who?
By Tina Schuelke, Executive Director
Change Management Communications Center LLC | www.cmccfoxvalley.com

Most of our clients are surprised when we coach them about communication plans. The most unanticipated part of our conversation about communication plans is centered on revealing best practices pertaining to senders and receivers of communications.

Research about business communication and more specifically, communication about change, shows us that employees have two preferred senders. A sender is the person delivering the message. The preferred sender is determined by the kind of message being communicated. Surprisingly missing on the preferred sender list is the project team. Employees are not fond of, and are less open to hearing information and direction about changes from the project team assigned to the change. One of the most common mistakes we see in communication plans for projects and major changes is that communications are being sent or presented directly by the project manager or the project team.

Here are some research-based tips to help you use the best sender in your communication plans for leading change:

Contact Change Management Communications Center today to co-create a communication plan for your project that ensures your audiences are open to hearing and taking positive action with the messages you need to deliver about the changes you are leading. Effective change communication is our forte.

Change Management Communications Center is a business consulting firm that specializes in change management. We help leaders and organizations build their authentic leadership styles and change competencies so they realize higher profits from the changes they lead and invest in.

Leadership * Succession Planning * Strategic Planning * Business Model Design * Executive Coaching * Process Improvement * Teambuilding * Innovation

www.cmccfoxvalley.com
Oshkosh, WI | Milwaukee, WI
(920)651-1144

How to Be an Effective Group Leader

Why Dominating Leaders Kill Teams

Dominating leaders tend to stifle creative ideas that might otherwise emerge from group discussions thus making the teams less productive.

Francesca Gino is an Associate Professor in the Negotiations, Organizations, and Markets Unit at Harvard Business School.  In the November 13, 2013 edition for “Working Knowledge” published by the Harvard Business School, Michael Blanding discusses Professor Gino’s series of studies in which she and her colleagues, Leigh Plunkett Tost of the University of Michigan and Richard P. Larrick of Duke University found that when leaders are focused on their own sense of power, they can hurt the performance of their teams—but with an important catch. The effects only occur when leaders are actually in a position of power.

Usually when we think about groups, we think that a strong leader naturally improves the functioning of the team. Professors Gino, Tost and Larrick explore this in depth in their article “When Power Makes Others Speechless: The Negative Impact of Leader Power on Team Performance”. In their work they differentiate between a “subjective sense of power,” that is, when someone thinks they have control over others, and actual power, when someone has formal authority over compensation, promotions, how resources are allocated or how decisions are made. Actual power and as sense of power often go hand in hand, but not always.

Sometimes in a group situation without a formal leader, a leadership role can be assumed by a person who believes he or she has superior knowledge or skills. The researchers found that in cases when someone felt powerful but was not recognized as being in a position of authority, team members were able to override that person’s domination of the conversation and add their own input.

As I would expect, they found that in the best performing groups, the leader orchestrates the conversation, and gets everyone talking. In other words, strong leaders can and do improve team performance when they go into a situation with a sense of humility about their own relative power.

On the other end of the spectrum, poor performing teams were dominated by a leader who made his power known, controlling the conversation and stifling input from the non-leader members of the group.

In conclusion, Professors Gino, Tost and Larrick suggest there is a powerful opportunity to improve performance just by making leaders aware of the dangers of hogging airtime in a discussion.

“I want to believe that oftentimes we behave the way we do because we are not aware of the effects of our actions,” says Gino. “Bringing this type of awareness to leaders walking into group decision-making situations could set up a different process whereby they benefit from what others have to offer.”

They further conclude that being aware of the negative effects generated by an overpowering leader can make non-leaders feel more empowered to assert their own point of view—whether or not the person dominating the conversation is a formal leader.  I believe that this requires the non-leaders to trust that the leader with power will not exercise that power against them.

It is no surprise to me that getting leaders to listen to others and to facilitate a productive group discussion is powerful indeed.

Read the complete article, here.

9 Things Successful People Do Differently

Why have you been so successful in reaching some of your goals, but not others?

If you aren’t sure, you are far from alone in your confusion. It turns out that even brilliant, highly accomplished people are pretty lousy when it comes to understanding why they succeed or fail. The intuitive answer — that you are born predisposed to certain talents and lacking in others — is really just one small piece of the puzzle. In fact decades of research on achievement suggests that successful people reach their goals not simply because of who they are but more often because of what they do.

1. Get specific. When you set yourself a goal, try to be as specific as possible. “Lose 5 pounds” is a better goal than “lose some weight,” because it gives you a clear idea of what success looks like. Knowing exactly what you want to achieve keeps you motivated until you get there. Also, think about the specific actions that need to be taken to reach your goal. Just promising you’ll “eat less” or “sleep more” is too vague — be clear and precise. “I’ll be in bed by 10pm on weeknights” leaves no room for doubt about what you need to do, and whether or not you’ve actually done it.

2. Seize the moment to act on your goals. Given how busy most of us are, and how many goals we are juggling at once, it’s not surprising that we routinely miss opportunities to act on a goal because we simply fail to notice them. Did you really have no time to work out today? No chance at any point to return that phone call? Achieving your goal means grabbing hold of these opportunities before they slip through your fingers.

To seize the moment, decide when and where you will take each action you want to take, in advance. Again, be as specific as possible (e.g., “If it’s Monday, Wednesday, or Friday, I’ll work out for 30 minutes before work.”) Studies show that this kind of planning will help your brain to detect and seize the opportunity when it arises, increasing your chances of success by roughly 300%.

3. Know exactly how far you have left to go. Achieving any goal also requires honest and regular monitoring of your progress — if not by others, then by you yourself. If you don’t know how well you are doing, you can’t adjust your behavior or your strategies accordingly. Check your progress frequently — weekly, or even daily, depending on the goal.

4. Be a realistic optimist. When you are setting a goal, by all means engage in lots of positive thinking about how likely you are to achieve it. Believing in your ability to succeed is enormously helpful for creating and sustaining your motivation. But whatever you do, don’t underestimate how difficult it will be to reach your goal. Most goals worth achieving require time, planning, effort, and persistence. Studies show that thinking things will come to you easily and effortlessly leaves you ill-prepared for the journey ahead, and significantly increases the odds of failure.

5. Focus on getting better, rather than being good. Believing you have the ability to reach your goals is important, but so is believing you can get the ability. Many of us believe that our intelligence, our personality, and our physical aptitudes are fixed — that no matter what we do, we won’t improve. As a result, we focus on goals that are all about proving ourselves, rather than developing and acquiring new skills.

Fortunately, decades of research suggest that the belief in fixed ability is completely wrong — abilities of all kinds are profoundly malleable. Embracing the fact that you can change will allow you to make better choices, and reach your fullest potential. People whose goals are about getting better, rather than being good, take difficulty in stride, and appreciate the journey as much as the destination.

6. Have grit. Grit is a willingness to commit to long-term goals, and to persist in the face of difficulty. Studies show that gritty people obtain more education in their lifetime, and earn higher college GPAs. Grit predicts which cadets will stick out their first grueling year at West Point. In fact, Dr. John Izzo, a recent TEC Inspirational Leadership speaker referred to studies that indicate that grit is a key component of managerial success.

The good news is, if you aren’t particularly gritty now, there is something you can do about it. People who lack grit more often than not believe that they just don’t have the innate abilities successful people have. If that describes your own thinking ….well, there’s no way to put this nicely: you are wrong. As I mentioned earlier, effort, planning, persistence, and good strategies are what it really takes to succeed. Embracing this knowledge will not only help you see yourself and your goals more accurately, but also do wonders for your grit.

7. Build your willpower muscle. Your self-control “muscle” is just like the other muscles in your body — when it doesn’t get much exercise, it becomes weaker over time. But when you give it regular workouts by putting it to good use, it will grow stronger and stronger, and better able to help you successfully reach your goals.

To build willpower, take on a challenge that requires you to do something you’d honestly rather not do. Give up high-fat snacks, do 100 sit-ups a day, stand up straight when you catch yourself slouching, try to learn a new skill. When you find yourself wanting to give in, give up, or just not bother — don’t. Start with just one activity, and make a plan for how you will deal with troubles when they occur (“If I have a craving for a snack, I will eat one piece of fresh or three pieces of dried fruit.”) It will be hard in the beginning, but it will get easier, and that’s the whole point. As your strength grows, you can take on more challenges and step-up your self-control workout.

8. Don’t tempt fate. No matter how strong your willpower muscle becomes, it’s important to always respect the fact that it is limited, and if you overtax it you will temporarily run out of steam. Don’t try to take on two challenging tasks at once, if you can help it (like quitting smoking and dieting at the same time). And don’t put yourself in harm’s way — many people are overly-confident in their ability to resist temptation, and as a result they put themselves in situations where temptations abound. Successful people know not to make reaching a goal harder than it already is.

9. Focus on what you will do, not what you won’t do. Do you want to successfully lose weight, quit smoking, or put a lid on your bad temper? Then plan how you will replace bad habits with good ones, rather than focusing only on the bad habits themselves. Research on thought suppression (e.g., “Don’t think about white bears!”) has shown that trying to avoid a thought makes it even more active in your mind. The same holds true when it comes to behavior — by trying not to engage in a bad habit, our habits get strengthened rather than broken.

If you want to change your ways, ask yourself, What will I do instead? For example, if you are trying to gain control of your temper and stop flying off the handle, you might make a plan like “If I am starting to feel angry, then I will take three deep breaths to calm down.” By using deep breathing as a replacement for giving in to your anger, your bad habit will get worn away over time until it disappears completely.

It is my hope that, after reading about the nine things successful people do differently, you have gained some insight into all the things you have been doing right all along. Even more important, I hope are able to identify the mistakes that have derailed you, and use that knowledge to your advantage from now on. Remember, you don’t need to become a different person to become a more successful one. It’s never what you are, but what you do.

Can You Lead Through a Disaster?

Headlines Read . . .

Violent thunderstorms. Fatal Flooding. Category 5 Hurricane. F-5 Tornado. Golf  Ball Sized Hail. 100 mph Straight Line Winds. Trees Uprooted. Power Outage for 12,000 Residents. Gas Line Explosion. Local Businesses Affected.

Leadership can be challenging when things are going well, there is always something you need to work through.

However, the rules of the game change when disaster strikes. Regardless of the cause, the best run businesses have prepared a plan to handle a potential disaster situation.

Are you prepared to operate your business the morning after a disaster?

Do you have a Disaster Recovery or Business Continuity Plan?

Up to 40% of businesses affected by a natural or human-caused disaster never reopen. (Source: Insurance Information Institute)

If your business is prepared you get an “A-Grade”!

If not, Ready.gov is a place you can get unbiased information and resources to help you and your team be prepared.

How We Will Operate | B. Charles Ames Series

How We Will Operate

This is the fourth in a series of posts that will describe what the CEO Reliance Electric thought about basic commitments, how the organization was going to operate and ground rules for managers. Once again, all the content of this article is based on the work of B. Charles Ames as outlined in his management manifesto titled Basic Management Concepts dated January 14, 1974.

Reliance Electric was a $1 billion conglomerate at the time our company was acquired.  They had been on a run of successful acquisitions for several years.  They owned about a hundred companies producing electric motors, power transmission equipment, retail food packaging and weighing equipment, telecommunications equipment, and more.

How do you run a conglomerate with a wide range of diverse businesses . . . effectively?  Ames wrote the following.

  • In light of Reliance Electric’s girth, the Divisions of the company needed to work together to take advantage of lessor endowed competitors.
  • The company centralized “certain functions” when it was economically advantageous.  The interests of the corporation trumped those of any individual Division.
  • Reliance followed a uniform set of administrative policies throughout all operations.  Human Resources, for example, would be managed consistently throughout the organization.

So far, so good.  Here is where it gets interesting. Ames was clear here:

  • The company would not force integration where it didn’t make sense or seek consistency among the Divisions without regard to individual differences of the Divisions.
  • The company would not impose corporate policies on decisions without seeking into from the Divisions.

What Ames wanted us to do was gain a competitive advantage from our size and diversity, without messing around with the basic integrity of the divisional profit center concept.  An interesting balancing act, to be sure.  And, the basic business strategy of the company.  Because Ames wrote it down and distributed it all of us, we knew what was expected.

B. Chuck Ames and his wife Jay currently manage the Ames Family Foundation.  They divide their time between a home in Vero Beach, Florida and a second home in a suburb of Cleveland.  

 

Unexpected Business Lessons from Artist Henri Matisse

Thanks Matisse!

I somewhat reluctantly (I am now embarrassed to say) attended the Henri Matisse retrospective at the Minneapolis Institute of Art. I freely admit to a limited appreciation for art, but this was a fantastic exhibition. And Matisse offered up some unexpected business lessons:

 “Each picture as I finish it, seems like the best thing I have ever done…. and yet after a while I am not so sure. It is like taking a train to Marseille. One knows where one wants to go. Each painting completed is like a station—just so much nearer the goal. The time comes when the painter is apt to feel he has at last arrived. Then, if he is honest, he realizes two things—either that he has not arrived at all or that Marseille… is not where he wanted to go anyway, and he must push farther on.” – Henri Matisse

The artist’s quote illuminates the business canvas. Like why we, and the organizations we create, are in a constant state of change, chaos, and renewal. Which helps me understand why I have never met a satisfied, successful CEO. Which helps me appreciate the best CEO’s I know who take extreme pleasure in the journey, including the ups and downs, and treat the achievement of a goal simply as a part of the process.

Successful enterprises, and the CEOs who run them, embrace as compatible equals both evolution and stability; they neither fear, nor overly celebrate, the moments of light and dark that ultimately lead to business excellence.

A contemporary artist of a different sort, Steve Jobs, said: “If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on.”

 

 

 

 

Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing | Becoming a Better Leader, Father, Husband, Friend and Person.

Armed with an extensive study guide, we are revisiting Lee Thayer’s book Leadership: Thinking, Being, Doing with all my TEC groups.  A very worthwhile exercise for becoming a better leader, father, husband, friend and person.

Leadership, Learning and Habits.

How does being judgmental get in the way of learning?  In every form of communication you will ever engage in with other people there is an old piece of unconventional wisdom that says,

You do not see the world as it is.

You see the world as you are.

 

This fits in with the discussion of “habits” offered as part of the launching pad for learning how to think like leaders think.  The first and last leadership lesson is:

We are led by our habits of feeling, of thinking, of perceiving,
and of understanding.

 

We don’t “have” our habits. They “have” us. They do what they do, go where they go, and we are left to clean up the aftermath. They are rarely something we are consciously aware of, particularly in advance. They are the shakers and movers of our lives. All of our being, doing, knowing, having, and saying are driven by our habits. They get entrenched because they get exercised—not intentionally, but by default. Our habits are like the default settings on your computer. They take over. They do what they do, with no commands or control by you.

Leaders know this beyond any doubt they might muster. They know they are “led” by their habits. So they know that to get to where they want to go, they have to have the kinds of habits that will take them there. Learning to be a pianist, or a tennis player, or a surgeon requires you to develop the kinds of habits that take over so you can concentrate on the anomalies and on the fine tuning. If you had to walk without thousands of built-in habits for doing so, you couldn’t do it. You would literally be unable to walk under conscious control.

Much more on this later . . .

TEC Congratulates our Inspirational Leader of the Year Award Honorees!

TEC Midwest announced the winners of its 2014 Inspirational Leadership Awards.

The TEC Wisconsin Award will go to Dennis Konkol, president of Miniature Precision Components Inc. of Walworth. MPC is approaching annual sales of $300 million with 1,600 employees and is continuing to expand. MPC is a Tier One supplier of automotive products to the major automotive manufacturers.

The 2014 TEC Michigan Award will go to Kevin Dent, CEO of Dentco (Dent Enterprises), based in DeWitt, Mich. Dentco has grown to annual sales of more than $30 million.

The 2014 TEC for Small Companies Award will go to Donna Gehl, president of Image Studios Inc. of Appleton.

The 2014 TEC Rising Star Award will go to John W. Mellowes, CEO of Charter Manufacturing Company Inc. of Mequon. Mellowes is the fourth generation of his family to lead Charter Manufacturing.

The 2014 TEC Lifetime Achievement Award will go to Jim Wessing, president of Kondex Corp. of Lomira. Wessing is proponent of the concept of servant leadership.

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