Organization and Staffing – Ground Rule #4 – Dealing with Advancing Age

This is the eleventh in a series of posts that will describe what the CEO of the Reliance Electric Company thought about basic commitments, how the organization was going to operate and ground rules for managers. Once again, all the content of this article is based on the work of B. Charles Ames as outlined in his management manifesto titled Basic Management Concepts dated January 14, 1974.

Organization and Staffing – Ground Rule #4 – Dealing with Advancing Age 

I am going to deviate a bit from my normal practice of simply repackaging the words Chuck Ames used in Basic Management Concepts for Ground Rule #4.  Ground Rule #4 deals with advancing age in the workforce.  Some of the content needs to be brought up to current EEOC standards.  Plus, there is some new research that suggests our opinions about the capabilities of older people in the workforce may not be quite accurate.  See “Why Everything You Know About Aging Is Probably Wrong” from the December 1, 2014 Wall Street Journal.

Ames wrote that some individuals, as they age, may reach a point where their job responsibilities exceed their energy levels and capabilities.  At some level this is certainly true and will indeed happen to us all.  Ames felt that the organization had an obligation to people who served it loyally.  He stated they should be paid fairly and given assignments where they could be successful.

He went on to say that older workers unable to make a continuing contribution needed to be removed from the mainstream.  He figured it wasn’t fair to the individual or the corporation to leave people in roles where they were likely to be unsuccessful.  An appropriate ground rule, regardless of age, I would add.

In conclusion he wrote that advancing age alone should not be a reason to exclude anyone from consideration for an assignment.  He stated there is nothing more wasteful than bypassing an experienced individual because of age even though that individual has the drive and energy to be successful.

Certainly an excellent ground rule whether it is 1974 or 2015.

B. Chuck Ames and his wife Jay currently manage the Ames Family Foundation.  They divide their time between a home in Vero Beach, Florida and a second home in a suburb of Cleveland.